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Be Well with Cathy Siley

wellness

March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits, both of which are part of your path to health and wellness.

The full definition of NUTRITION according to Merriam Webster is “the act or process of nourishing or being nourished; specifically:  the sum of the processes by which an animal or plant takes in and utilizes food substances.”  Webster’s simple definition, however, is one that we should really take to heart: “the process of eating the right kind of food so you can grow properly and be healthy.”

Over the next several weeks, we will visit some of the components of nutrition and healthy eating.  In the mean time, here’s something YOU can do:  Make a food journal.   Take a few minutes out of your day and log every morsel of food that you consume.    Many apps such as My Fitness Pal have easy food logging systems, or just do it the old-fashioned way … write it down on a piece of paper.

Don’t cheat … and don’t suddenly switch your eating habits just because you are paying attention to them!  Eat how you typically eat, and write it all down, including how much of each thing you consume.  You can keep it simple, however the more specific you are the more knowledge you can gain.  Try to log EVERYTHING, including condiments and all ingredients used in cooking your meals.  If you eat out, write down what you ordered – and don’t forget to include any extras such as items from the breadbasket or a forkful of your friend’s dessert!  Remember to track how much water and other liquids you consume, as hydration is a key component to good nutrition and you may be consuming beverages that are giving you too many calories or too little nutrients.

Track your intake for a minimum of 3 days … or better yet, bump it up to 5-7 days to include weekends.  This will provide a larger snapshot of your food consumption and eating habits.  Make it a fun group project and have all members of your family track what they eat!  Take a good look at what you see … You may be surprised at the results!  Be mindful of your eating, and Be Well!

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The Solebury Club welcomes Personal Trainer Lisa Wagner

 

lisa-wagner-(2)

Qualifications: Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science, CPR/AED certified

Personal Training Style: Interval training with focus on proper form

Quote: Carpe Diem…”Seize The Day”

I was born and raised in Colorado. I have been living here in Doylestown for the past 13 years.  I was a competitive international gymnast growing up and started coaching gymnastics when I was 14.  I have been teaching fitness in one form or another for 25 years.  I was a Physical Education teacher for many years and taught health education to 7&8th grades.

I believe that having good form and learning exercises properly is very important.  I like to combine weights and cardio in my training. I know personally this has been a valuable combination in gaining muscle and improving my endurance at the same time.  I like to keep training intense but that doesn’t mean you can’t smile, laugh and have fun too. It is important to enjoy what you are doing know matter what it may be and that includes working out.

I have been many different shapes and sizes in my life. I have two great kids and have had to lose the “baby weight.”  I have battled injuries and recovered from surgeries.  I understand how it is to need and want to get back in shape and the ups and downs of fitness and exercise.  I know that there were times in my life when I needed someone by my side guiding me to achieve my fitness goals.  I am happy and thrilled to be a personal trainer because I do care about people and want my clients achieve their goals.  Exercise and fitness is different for everyone and I take that into consideration as I train you as an individual.

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Be Well with Cathy Siley

wellness

Exercise and Cardiovascular Health

February is Heart Month … Are you doing all that you can to keep your heart healthy?  Cardiovascular exercise is a key component to healthy hearts, and like most other forms of exercise, can be done on a number of different levels depending on what your end goal is.

In order to maintain overall cardiovascular health, being physically active is one of the most important things you can do to prevent heart disease and stroke, the nation’s #1and #5 killers.  According to the American Heart Association, you should strive for at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity) to improve overall cardiovascular health. Thirty minutes a day, five times a week is an easy goal to remember.

For people who would benefit from lowering their blood pressure or cholesterol, AHA recommends a little bit more … 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity three to four times a week to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke.  Are you “too busy” at work, school or with life??  You will also experience benefits even if you divide your time into two or three segments of 10 to 15 minutes per day.  Physical activity is anything that makes you move your body and burn calories.

In addition to maintaining overall cardiovascular health, if your end goal includes losing some weight, then your exercise goals will be a little bit different. There are many misconceptions out there … primarily that increasing the amount of straight cardio you do will burn more calories.  While this can be true, it is important to understand what your target heart rates are, then adapting your workout routines to be within those target zones.  Understanding heart rate zones, and keeping your heart rates within them, will allow for more efficient workouts, and will help you come closer to achieving weight loss goals.

And remember, maintaining heart health as well as achieving weight loss goals through increased cardiovascular exercise doesn’t mean you are chained to a treadmill … it can be realized through countless forms of exercise you can do right here at The Solebury Club.  Take a fitness class, do some Vinyasa or Hot Flow Yoga, and even lift some weights … yes, strength training can improve cardiovascular health too!   If you have never worked with a trainer before, talk to the front desk … ALL Solebury Club members are entitled to a free consultation with a personal trainer.  They can help answer any questions you may have and keep you on track with your healthy goals.

So keep on exercising, and keep that heart healthy!

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Be Well with Cathy Siley

wellness

 

February is Heart Month!

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.  Every year, approximately 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.  The good news is that heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions.  Here at The Solebury Club, we are dedicated to helping you stick to these goals!

The American Heart Association has designed My Life Check … a quick and easy “Simple 7” checklist of things YOU can actively control in your life.  These measures have one thing in common: any person can make these changes.  The steps are not expensive to take, and even modest improvements to your health will make a big difference.  Start with one or two, work your way up, and live a long, productive healthy life!

Manage Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.  Most pharmacies have free blood pressure testing, so check it often!

Control Cholesterol
High cholesterol contributes to plaque, which can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages.   When was the last time you had your cholesterol checked??

Reduce Blood Sugar
Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Over time, high levels of blood sugar can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves.  Take a few days and keep a diary of what you eat.  You may be surprised at what you see!

Get Active
Living an active life is one of the most rewarding gifts you can give yourself and those you love. Simply put, daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life.  Lift those weights, take a class, or just jump on some cardio equipment and get that blood pumping!

Eat Better
A healthy diet is one of your best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease. When you eat a heart-healthy diet, you improve your chances for feeling good and staying healthy – for life!

If Needed, Lose Weight
When you shed extra fat and unnecessary pounds, you reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You give yourself the gift of active living, you lower your blood pressure and you help yourself feel better, too.

Stop Smoking
Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.

Keep your heart healthy right here at The Solebury Club!

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Be Well with Cathy Siley

wellness

 

February is Heart Month!

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.  Every year, approximately 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.  The good news is that heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions.  Here at The Solebury Club, we are dedicated to helping you stick to these goals!

The American Heart Association has designed My Life Check … a quick and easy “Simple 7” checklist of things YOU can actively control in your life.  These measures have one thing in common: any person can make these changes.  The steps are not expensive to take, and even modest improvements to your health will make a big difference.  Start with one or two, work your way up, and live a long, productive healthy life!

Manage Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.  Most pharmacies have free blood pressure testing, so check it often!

Control Cholesterol
High cholesterol contributes to plaque, which can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages.   When was the last time you had your cholesterol checked??

Reduce Blood Sugar
Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Over time, high levels of blood sugar can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves.  Take a few days and keep a diary of what you eat.  You may be surprised at what you see!

Get Active
Living an active life is one of the most rewarding gifts you can give yourself and those you love. Simply put, daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life.  Lift those weights, take a class, or just jump on some cardio equipment and get that blood pumping!

Eat Better
A healthy diet is one of your best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease. When you eat a heart-healthy diet, you improve your chances for feeling good and staying healthy – for life!

If Needed, Lose Weight
When you shed extra fat and unnecessary pounds, you reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You give yourself the gift of active living, you lower your blood pressure and you help yourself feel better, too.

Stop Smoking
Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.

Keep your heart healthy right here at The Solebury Club!

 

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VO2 and Metabolic Testing with Maria

 

vo2 testing

What is a Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Test?

Metabolism is the process of converting food (calories) into energy. The efficiency with which your body does this is referred to as your metabolic rate. Many factors affect a person’s metabolic rate: weight, age, body composition, hormone levels, and gender, making it a highly unique number.

Why test your metabolic rate?

Understanding your body’s unique metabolic rate will allow your trainer to customize your weight loss or maintenance program around your needs. It can screen for a slowed metabolism that may explain frustrated attempts to lose weight in the past. It can reveal changes in your metabolism during the weight loss process that can help troubleshoot a frustrating plateau. Once you reach your goal, an RMR measurement can give you the precise caloric prescription for maintenance to help you sustain that goal weight.

How does the test work?

KORR Metabolic Analyzers utilize the same technology as ICU metabolic testing. Because every calorie a person consumes requires a fixed amount of oxygen to be converted to energy, the KORR Analyzer measures the oxygen you consume to calculate calories burned. All of the air exhaled by the patient must be collected to measure oxygen consumption. Two one-way valves in the KORR MetaBreather ensure that only fresh air is inhaled and all exhaled gas passes through the hose and into the machine. A nose-clip ensures that all exhaled air is analyzed.

In order to get the most accurate results, it is important to follow the standard protocol for a Resting Metabolic Rate test:

1.You should avoid eating 4 hours before the test.

2. Avoid exercising prior to your test.

3. If possible, avoid the use of stimulants, such as caffeine.

During the test, you will be invited to sit or recline in a comfortable position. You will be given a KORR MetaBreather mouthpiece to breathe into. You will be breathing in air from the room, but the gas that you breathe out will go into the metabolic analyzer to measure your metabolic rate.

Testing is available on Wednesdays 7:30am-1:00pm, Monday and Saturday mornings by appointment.  Register at the Front Desk.

Metabolic Test is $55 per session

VO2 Test $115 per session

Click here to learn more about Maria.

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To Prevent Back Pain, Orthotics Are Out, Exercise Is In

back pain

 

Lower back pain is an almost universal if unwelcome experience. About 80 percent of those of us in the Western world can expect to suffer from disruptive lower back pain at some point in our lives. But if we begin and stick with the right type of exercise program, we might avoid a recurrence, according to a comprehensive new scientific review of back pain prevention.

Lower back pain develops for many reasons, including lifestyle, genetics, ergonomics, sports injuries, snow shoveling or just bad luck. Most often, in fact, the underlying cause is unknown.

For most people, a first episode of back pain will go away within a week or so.

However, back pain recurs with distressing frequency. By most estimates about 75 percent of people who have had one debilitating episode of lower back pain will have another within a year.

These repeated bouts can set off what doctors and researchers call a “spiral of decline,” in which someone takes to his or her couch because of the pain; this inactivity weakens muscles and joints; the person’s now-feebler back and core become less able to sustain the same level of activity as before and succumb when he or she tries to return to normal life, leading to more pain and more inactivity; and the spiral accelerates.

This scenario obviously makes preventing back pain, especially in someone who already has undergone at least one episode, extremely desirable. But until now, few studies have systematically examined what really works against repeated back pain and what doesn’t.

So for the new review, which was published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers affiliated with the George Institute for Global Health at the University of Sydney in Australia and other institutions set out to gather and analyze as many relevant studies as possible.

There were surprising few high-quality studies, meaning those that had randomized participants to be treated or not. But after scouring through more than 6,000 studies about back-pain prevention, the researchers settled on 23 that they felt to be methodologically robust. These studies had examined, in total, more than 30,000 participants with back pain.

The prevention techniques under review included education about lifestyle changes, shoe orthotics, back belts, various types of exercise programs and exercise programs that also included some type of education about back-pain prevention.

For the purposes of the review, a successful prevention program was one that had kept someone from reporting another bout of back pain within a year or longer or that had staved off lost work time due to back problems.

Such success, as it turned out, was discouragingly limited. Educational efforts by themselves showed essentially zero ability to prevent a recurrence of back pain, the researchers found. Back belts and orthotics likewise were almost completely ineffective, leaving people who employed either of those methods very prone to experiencing more back pain within a year.

But exercise programs, either with or without additional educational elements, proved to be potent preventatives, the researchers found.

In fact, “the size of the protective effect” from exercise “was quite large,” said Chris Maher, a professor at the George Institute, who oversaw the new review. “Exercise combined with education reduced the risk of an episode of low back pain in the next year by 45 percent. In other words, it almost halved the risk.”

Interestingly, the type of exercise program didn’t matter. In some of the experiments that Dr. Maher and his colleagues reviewed, the regimens focused solely on strengthening the core and back muscles. In others, the training was more general, combining aerobic conditioning with strength and balance training. Most asked participants to complete two or three supervised sessions every week, typically for about two months, although some lasted longer. A few included education programs as well.

The end result was that if someone with a history of back pain exercised in a regular way, he or she was considerably less likely to be felled by more back pain within a year.

However, the protective effects typically wore off after that, with recurrences rising after 12 months, probably because many of the people who’d been involved in the studies stopped exercising, Dr. Maher said, and their back problems returned.

So based on the currently available evidence, he said, it’s still impossible to know whether exercise improves back health in the long-term, or if one type of exercise program is measurably better than others. He and his colleagues hope to mount studies comparing different routines head-to-head and follow people for several years.

But for now, he says, “of all the options currently available to prevent back pain, exercise is really the only one with any evidence that it works.”

If you are curious about the particulars of an effective back-exercise program, Dr. Maher points to one example, a full regimen of exercises from a 1991 study in the journal Physical Therapy, one of the studies included in the new analysis. Its suggested workout soundtrack of 1990s Swedish pop tunes is, however, optional.

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